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iml-courses

Institute for Mathematics Learning

IML Courses

Below are brief descriptions of courses that are under the Institute for Mathematics Learning. Official course descriptions can be found in the WVU Catalog

Official WVU Course Catalog

Math Course Math 121 - Introductory Concepts of Mathematics
Coordinator Dr. Erin Goodykoontz
Brief Description / Syllabus This course is designed for non-science majors who do not need advanced techniques of mathematics for other course work in their programs. The course includes topics in modern mathematics and does not serve as a prerequisite for any other math course.

Syllabus


Math Course Math 122 - Quantitative Skill and Reasoning
Coordinator Betsy Kuhn
Brief Description / Syllabus This course is a review of quantitative skills, including the arithmetic and algebra needed for science, technology, engineering and mathematics related disciplines and as a prerequisite for higher-level mathematics courses. Students in majors that do not require college algebra or calculus should consider MATH 121 or STAT 111 instead.

Syllabus


Math Course Math 124 - Algebra and Applications
Coordinator Clark Metz
Brief Description / Syllabus This course is a study of algebra with an emphasis on applications for science, business, technology, and social science. Topics include graphing and solving problems using linear, quadratic, square-root, logarithmic, and exponential functions, solving equations, and performing operations on matrices. This course will serve as a pre-requisite course for Math 150 and is not intended for students planning to enroll in Math 155.


Math Course Math 126 - College Algebra
Coordinator Dr. Laura Pyzdrowski
Brief Description / Syllabus The goals of College Algebra are that after finishing this course students will be able to understand and use the concept of a function; solve mathematical application problems by connecting mathematical results to contextual meanings; solve equations and inequalities in one variable using multiple representations, graph equations and functions and relate graphical features to related algebraic and numeric features; use and compare algebraic, graphical, and numerical approaches to solving problems involving lines, parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperboles; use and compare algebraic, graphical, and numerical approaches to solve problems involving, functions (including
higher order polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential and logarithmic).

STEM Syllabus

Non-STEM Syllabus


Math Course Math 128 - Trigonometry
Coordinator Dr. Nicole Infante
Brief Description / Syllabus The goals of Trigonometry are that after completing this course students will be able to choose the appropriate interpretation of function (algebraic, graphic, and numeric), especially for trigonometric; identify functions arising from the study of circular motion; apply right angle trigonometry and trigonometric functions of general angles to relevant problems; model with trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; solve trigonometric equations and inequalities analytically, approximately, and graphically; utilize trigonometric identities to simplify expressions; make use of trigonometric identities to develop exact values of trigonometric ratios of non-special angles; interpret graphs of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions and define their domains and ranges; utilize the Law of Sines and Law of Cosines to solve problems related to oblique triangles; and formulate and solve problems using vectors and the polar coordinate system.

Syllabus


Math Course Math 129 - PreCalculus
Coordinator Dr. Lori Ogden
Brief Description / Syllabus This course is a treatment of algebra, analytic geometry, and trigonometry. Not open to students who have credit for the equivalent of either MATH 126 or 128. Pre-requisite(s) and/or co-requisite(s) may differ on regional campuses.

Syllabus


Math Course Math 150 - Applied Calculus
Coordinator Doug Squire
Brief Description / Syllabus This course is for students in disciplines needing calculus for applications. The course includes limits of sequences and functions, continuity derivatives, and integrals of polynomials, rational functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions, partial derivatives, maxima and minima. Pre-requisite(s) and/or co-requisite(s) may differ on regional campuses.

Syllabus